What can The Young Ones teach us about Thatcherism? part one

New Historical Express

This is the beginning of a work-in-progress piece I have been devising on The Young Ones and Thatcherism. I thought I would post it as the clip is great and rather topical. If you can think of any particular bits in the series that have historical relevance for understanding Thatcherite Britain, please comment below.

In one of my history topics that I used to team-teach in, I presented a lecture of Thatcherism and Britain in the 1980s. In this lecture, I showed my students a clip from the episode ‘Cash’ from the UK television comedy show The Young Ones. The scene portrays one of the characters pretending to have a baby in a non-furnished house. In the panic of the impending ‘baby’ (the character, Vyvyan, is actually male), another character, Rik (the typical student-lefty stereotype), yells:

We can’t, we haven’t got any money. Vyvyan’s baby will be a pauper…

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“Rolling Stones” | Rice Krispies Cereal TV Ad

Source: “Rolling Stones” | Rice Krispies Cereal TV Ad (WATCH VIDEO).

Brian Jones, the founding member of Rolling Stones wrote the jingle, and the band was paid 400£ for the performance.

Queen’s Freddie Mercury and David Bowie’s “Under Pressure” Isolated Vocals Are Heavenly

Towards an egalitarianism of respect

The most interesting part of the left-wing responses to the assortative mating dilemma is to talk about another topic.

They fully accept that government cannot go around regulating whom people marry despite the fact this is a major source of inequality.

The reason why this inequality is acceptable because they acknowledge implicitly the point that Nozick made about how the inequality came about is important. If the inequality is the result of people exercising their rights, the inequality is just

The Sand Pit

Last night, debate teams from Victoria University at Wellington and from Canterbury squared off to debate the moot, “This house would ban people with university degrees from marrying each other.”

It was great fun. Vic had the affirmative and did a fantastic job with it. Canterbury won, partially because the affirmative wasn’t able to show it would be enforceable without substantial offsetting harms.

Matt Nolan, of TVHE fame and who’s finishing up his thesis on inequality, was one of the the panellists after the debaters had finished; I was the second. I’ve copied my speaking notes below, but delivery varied a bit. I think the debate was videoed; I’ll update this post with it when it’s available.

You might have come in tonight scratching your heads a bit about tonight’s moot. The proposed policy is obviously absurd: a far more intrusive extension of the state into people’s lives than most…

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Keynesian macroeconomics explained

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John Belushi and the donuts of champions

HT: Lars Christensen

Nature: There are Worse Threats to Biodiversity than Climate Change

Watts Up With That?

1944 Picture of Bulldozers 1944 Picture of Bulldozers

Guest essay by Eric Worrall

A commentary published in Nature has claimed that careless human exploitation of natural resources poses a far greater threat to endangered species than climate change.

Biodiversity: The ravages of guns, nets and bulldozers

There is a growing tendency for media reports about threats to biodiversity to focus on climate change.

Here we report an analysis of threat information gathered for more than 8,000 species. These data revealed a contrasting picture. We found that by far the biggest drivers of biodiversity decline are overexploitation (the harvesting of species from the wild at rates that cannot be compensated for by reproduction or regrowth) and agriculture (the production of food, fodder, fibre and fuel crops; livestock farming; aquaculture; and the cultivation of trees).

Early next month, representatives from government, industry and non-governmental organizations will define future directions for conservation at the World Conservation Congress…

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1984: The year the Olympics were mostly privatized

Mostly Economics

Didn’t know this at all. Olympics in LA were mostly through private efforts:

Put off by the financial setbacks experienced by Montréal and still grappling with the turmoil and political unrest left by the Cold War, the 1984 Summer Games were not particularly popular when it came to attracting potential host cities. In fact, only two cities even officially bid to host the 1984 Olympic Games: New York City and Los Angeles.

Los Angeles won the bid in the end, but its residents were not enthusiastic about this decision nor were they willing to foot the bill. The people of Los Angeles were so adamant about protecting their tax dollars from wasteful spending that they proceeded to pass a city charter prohibiting the use of public funds to be used for Olympic facilities. The city now had the honor of hosting the Olympic Games, but no way to pay…

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More Darwin awards applications

HT: Des Rowe

I,chicken sandwich

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