The Usual Suspects – the line-up

Sometimes, multiple takes result in a scene you could never have expected. For this film’s famous police line-up sequence, in which a group of thieves meet each other and plan a heist, director Christopher McQuarrie wanted a serious, dangerous tone, but the actors were having too good a time in each other’s company. Numerous takes were spoiled by corpsing, another was interrupted by comically-timed flatulence.

In the end, McQuarries reversed course and used one of the sillier takes in the final cut. It worked perfectly. The scene is now an iconic depiction of camaraderie among thieves, unintentionally reinforcing Kevin Spacey’s voice-over that accompanies it: “You don’t put guys like that into a room together.”

Source: Let’s try that again … the most difficult scenes to film in cinema history | Film | The Guardian

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Now that Article 50 has been triggered, reality will start to bite

The Constitution Unit Blog

Following the triggering of Article 50, the honeymoon period is over for Theresa May. Oliver Patel outlines the main challenges which the UK faces in the upcoming negotiations. He argues that securing a deal within the two period will be hard enough. Securing a deal which pleases everyone – or anyone at all – will be virtually impossible.

Theresa May has had an easy ride so far. Up until now, she has only had to worry about pleasing her core domestic audiences. Now that Article 50 has been triggered, however, reality will start to bite. The two-year road to Brexit is fraught with uncertainty, obstacles and challenges. Two stand out above all else. First, given the complexity of the task, two years is an extremely short length of time in which to negotiate and finalise the UK’s withdrawal. Second, getting a deal which satisfies everyone – the British public, the EU…

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CO2 ≠ Pollutant

Science Matters

My university degree is a Bachelors in Organic Chemistry from Stanford. For that and other reasons, it always annoyed me that some lawyers decided CO2 can be called a “pollutant”, all the while exhaling the toxic gas themselves.

This nonsense forms the root of all the ridiculous regulations that POTUS ordered reviewed and rescinded yesterday. Thus I agree completely with this Wall Street Journal article by Paul Tice Trump’s Next Step on Climate Change. Full text below.

Reconsider the EPA’s labeling of carbon dioxide as a pollutant, based on now-outdated science.

By PAUL H. TICE
March 28, 2017 6:41 p.m. ET

The executive orders on climate change President Trump signed this week represent a step in the right direction for U.S. energy policy and, importantly, deliver on Mr. Trump’s campaign promise to roll back burdensome regulations affecting American companies. But it will take more than the stroke of a…

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A Brief History of Global Warming and Global Cooling Panic

American Elephants

“The White House forged ahead Monday with yet another piece of its climate change agenda and bragged that Republicans are powerless to stop it.” reported the Washington Times.

A presidential task force unveiled a report on how communities across the country can prepare for the effects of global warming. In all, the recommendations on “climate preparedness and resilience” could cost the federal government more than $100 billion to protect drinking water supplies, shore up coastlines against rising sea levels and take other preventive measures.

The rise in sea level is measured in millimeters, not feet. There has been no warming at all for over eighteen years. The ice is already forming on the Great Lakes, and it looks like we’re in for a really cold winter—yet the EPA is intent on shutting down as many coal-fired power plants as they can because they might emit carbon dioxide — which…

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Brave Climatologist Dr. Judith Curry Testifies.

American Elephants

Dr. Judith Curry has had the temerity to question the reigning authorities in climate science. Here she is testifying before the Commerce, Science and Transportation Subcommittee. This is one very brave and honest lady. Here’s an article from Reason that explains why she resigned her position as Chair of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Georgia Institute of Technology.

The following videos that pop up when you finish this one vary, so I can’t point you to any specific one, but if you have time keep watching. There are some doozys there. Ted Cruz and the head of the Sierra Club, Mark Steyn and Senator Markey, and more.

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Understanding innovation markets in antitrust analysis [Ag-Biotech Symposium]

Truth on the Market

Joanna Shepherd is Professor of Law at Emory University School of Law.

Today, three of the largest proposed mergers — Bayer/Monsanto, Dow/Dupont, and ChemChina/Syngenta — face scrutiny in both the U.S. and Europe over concerns that the mergers will slow innovation in crop biotechnology and crop protection.   The incorporation of innovation effects in the antitrust analysis of these agricultural/biotech mergers is quickly becoming more mainstream in both the U.S. and E.U. The concerns are premised on the idea that, by merging existing competitors into one firm, consolidation will reduce incentives to develop new products in the future.  Since 2015, the Department of Justice has opposed proposed mergers between Applied Materials/Tokyo Electron, Comcast/Time Warner Cable, and Halliburton/Baker Hughes at least partly based on innovation concerns. Similarly, the European Commission has raised innovation concerns in its analyses of several mergers since 2015, including Biomet/Zimmer Holdings, GlaxoSmithKline/Novartis, and BASE/…

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