Day: May 27, 2018

“The Ultimate Global Antipoverty Program”

American Elephants

It’s the greatest achievement
in human history,
and one you probably
never heard about.”

Extreme poverty in the world fell to 15% in 2011, from 36% in 1990.  The credit goes to the spread of capitalism. The past 25 years have witnessed the greatest reduction in global poverty in the history of the world. An 80% reduction in world poverty in only 36 years.

The World Bank reported on Oct. 9 that the share of the world population living in extreme poverty had fallen to 15% in 2011 from 36% in 1990. Earlier this year, the International Labor Office reported that the number of workers in the world earning less than $1.25 a day has fallen to 375 million 2013 from 811 million in 1991. …

The reduction in world poverty has attracted little attention because it runs against the narrative pushed by those hostile to capitalism. The Michael…

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History: The Great War – E05/26 – This Business May Last A Long Time

The Inquiring Mind

From Wikipedia

The Great War is a 26-episode documentary series from 1964 on the First World War. The documentary was a co-production of the Imperial War Museum, the British Broadcasting Corporation, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and the Australian Broadcasting Commission. The narrator was Michael Redgrave, with readings by Marius Goring, Ralph Richardson, Cyril Luckham, Sebastian Shaw and Emlyn Williams. Each episode is c.40 minutes long.

In August 1963, at the suggestion of Alasdair Milne, producer of the BBC’s current affairs programme Tonight, the BBC resolved to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the outbreak of the First World War with a big television project. The series was the first to feature veterans, many of them still relatively fit men in their late sixties or early seventies, speaking of their experiences after a public appeal for veterans was published in…

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Game Theory and Cheating

Core Economics

A controversial blog post from an NYU Stern School professor has been circulating. The original has been removed but it is available here. From reading it, I can’t understand why the original was taken down. It is a solid tale and, in the end, the cheaters were caught.

Let me recap the story. Professor offers assignment to class that is the same as previous years. This is the first year the Professor has had easy access to Turnitin; a copying detection tool which is extremely effective. This is also the first year the Professor has tenure (but I think that is secondary). The Professor first notices lots of students just coping and pasting from the Internet (direct plagiarism). He decides to admonish rather than punish. Then he discovers copying of past assignments. Much hilarity ensues as the offenders try to talk themselves out of it (using the old…

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