Thomas Schelling and Dr. Strangelove

cryptonomics

An interview with Thomas Schelling and his role in the creation of one of my favorite movies, “Dr. Strangelove”. HKS reports,

Kubrick travelled to Cambridge to meet with Schelling and George. The three spent an afternoon wrestling with a considerable plot hole: when “Red Alert” was written in 1958, inter-continental ballistic missiles were not much of a consideration in a potential U.S.-Soviet showdown. But by 1962, ICBMs had made much of the book’s plot points impossible. The speed at which a missile strike could occur would offer no time for the plot to unfold. “We had a hard time getting a war started,” said Schelling.

Hence, the B52s?

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Supreme Court rules in favor of baker who refused to make a wedding cake for gays

Why Evolution Is True

UPDATE: The Freedom from Religion Foundation, whose take I wanted on this case, has issued a bulletin on this decision, “Missed opportunity; Supreme Court punts on important case, manufactures hostility toward religion where none exists.” The FFRF had written an amicus brief to the Court supporting the gay couple, and think that this decision was misguided. An excerpt from their bulletin (my emphasis):

This decision is based on the Free Exercise of religion argument and, had it been decided as the Religious Right argued, it would have thrown open the doors for all kinds of discrimination, especially racial discrimination and discrimination against religious minorities and nonbelievers. During oral argument, it was clear that none of the justices or the bakery’s attorneys could draw a legal line that would allow discrimination against LGBTQ customers but not black, Asian, Jewish or atheist customers. During that argument, Justice Stephen Breyer…

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David Friedman | Full Address and Q&A | Oxford Union

Review of “The Path to Power: The Years of Lyndon Johnson (Vol 1)” by Robert Caro

My Journey Through the Best Presidential Biographies

The Path to Power: The Years of Lyndon Johnson” is the first volume in Robert Caro’s epic series covering the life of Lyndon B. Johnson.  Caro is a former investigative reporter and the author of two Pulitzer Prize-winning biographies: “Master of the Senate” (the third volume in this series) and “The Power Broker” about the life of Robert Moses.  Caro is currently working on the fifth (and, presumably, final) volume in his LBJ series.

Published in 1982, “The Path to Power” is the inaugural volume in a series that has consumed more than four decades of Caro’s life. Originally intended to be the first of just three volumes, its 768 pages follow Johnson from birth through his unsuccessful bid for a Senate seat in 1941. This biography is the result of seven years of research by Caro and his wife – a remarkable effort…

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History: BBC – The Great War – E06/26 – So Sleep Easy In Your Beds

The Inquiring Mind

From Wikipedia

The Great War is a 26-episode documentary series from 1964 on the First World War. The documentary was a co-production of the Imperial War Museum, the British Broadcasting Corporation, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and the Australian Broadcasting Commission. The narrator was Michael Redgrave, with readings by Marius Goring, Ralph Richardson, Cyril Luckham, Sebastian Shaw and Emlyn Williams. Each episode is c.40 minutes long.

In August 1963, at the suggestion of Alasdair Milne, producer of the BBC’s current affairs programme Tonight, the BBC resolved to mark the fiftieth anniversary of the outbreak of the First World War with a big television project. The series was the first to feature veterans, many of them still relatively fit men in their late sixties or early seventies, speaking of their experiences after a public appeal for veterans was published in…

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