Ultra-Orthodox Men Delay Two More Flights Until Women Agree To Move From Their Seats

Why should it take years and litigation to get the airline to take the obvious step of removing these unruly passengers. If these men cannot abide sitting next to a woman, they can buy tickets in seats next to each other. Problem solved.

JONATHAN TURLEY

Austrian_Airlines_Logo_(2013).svgWe have previously discussed flights delayed by Jewish ultra-Orthodox who refuse to sit next to women.  Rather than remove these men for delaying a flight, airlines bizarrely coerce women to yield to their demands in moving their seats.  Just a week ago, an El Al flight was delayed by ultra-Orthodox men refusing to take their seats.  Now, an Austrian Airlines plane was delayed at Ben Gurion Airport for 40 minutes late due to the refusal of 26 ultra-Orthodox men to be seated by women.  Again, there is no consideration for the other passengers, particularly the women who are singled out for requests to move to other seats to accommodate these men. Worse yet, because Austrian Airlines decided to accommodate the demands of these men, other passengers missed their connecting flights.  

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How to rig an election

I wonder why strongmen and autocrats run elections that are blatantly rigged. What are they trying to prove?

The Constitution Unit Blog

nic.cheeseman.oxfamOCkVQdGe_400x400 (1)As elections become more prevalent as the stated method of choosing who governs, is the world actually becoming less democratic? In their new book, How to Rig an ElectionNic Cheeseman and Brian Klaas argue that the increase in voting has not led to a corresponding rise in the embracing of democratic norms, with voter intimidation, strategic misinformation, and ballot-rigging common in many countries that describe themselves as democratic.

The greatest political paradox of our time is this: there are more elections than ever before, but the world is becoming less democratic.

Nowadays, elections are held almost everywhere. The vast majority of governments at least go through the motions of election campaigns, and are rhetorically committed to allowing citizens to cast ballots to choose the leaders who will govern them. However, in many places, that choice is little more than an illusion: the contest is rigged from the start.

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Fair trade coffee less than palatable to the latte left

Better than smokers. They greatly overestimate the risks of their disgusting habit @cjsnowdon

Intersectionality must be able to explain this

California: World Leading Climate Hypocrite

Always amazed at the ability of environmentalists to believe in peak oil and runaway global warming too

Science Matters

California’s Climate Extremism
Joel Kotkin reports from the Golden State. Excerpts in italics with my bolds.

The pursuit of environmental purity in the Golden State does nothing to reverse global warming—but it’s costing the poor and middle class dearly.

Environmental extremism increasingly dominates California. The state is making a concerted attack on energy companies in the courts; a bill is pending in the legislature to fine waiters $1,000—or jail them—if they offer people plastic straws; and UCLA issued a report describing pets as a climate threat. The state has taken upon itself the mission of limiting the flatulence of cows and other farm animals. As the self-described capital of the anti-Trump resistance, California presents itself as the herald of a green, more socially and racially just society. That view has been utterly devastated by a new report from Chapman University, in which coauthors David Friedman…

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Supreme Court rules that “hate speech” is free speech

Why Evolution Is True

On Sunday, by a vote of 8-0 (Gorsuch didn’t rule), the U.S. Supreme Court decided the case of Matal v. Tam,  which involved a patent application to trademark the name “The Slants,” an Asian band of which Simon Tam was a member. Tam’s attempt to patent trademark the band’s name was rejected by the trademark office, but a federal appeals court ruled that that rejection was illegal because the U.S.’s Lanham Act (1946), under which the application was rejected, was unconstitutional. That Act is the U.S.’s main trademark law, and prohibits trademarks that disparage individuals or groups. The initial rejection was, I think, based on the fact that “slant” is a slur on Asians, referring to their eye shape (they have an epicanthal fold), and thus that the name disparages an ethnic group.  The Slants comprise four Asian-Americans, but that doesn’t matter:

The Slants

The appeals…

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NYT legal columnist: Let’s rethink the First Amendment now that it’s being used by conservatives

Why Evolution Is True

My title may be exaggerated a tad, but not that much, for the point of Adam Liptak’s article (click on screenshot below) is that conservatives are starting to use the First Amendment to defend or buttress legal decisions that liberals don’t like, and therefore the First Amendment is outdated or should be reexamined. The title of the piece comes from Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan, a liberal who decried her courts’ recent decisions against public unions and in favor of religious abortion “crisis centers” on freedom-of-speech grounds. Further, the Citizens United case, in which corporations were allowed unlimited spending on political campaigns, was also deemed by the Court to be a free speech issue. (Here I disagree on the grounds that corporations are not individuals.)

Liptak is a New York Times reporter whose beat is the US Supreme Court; he also writes the legal column “Sidebar” for the paper. Have…

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The Hansen forecasts 30 years later

Climate Etc.

by Ross McKitrick and John Christy

Note: this is a revised version to correct the statement about CFCs and methane in Scenario B.

How accurate were James Hansen’s 1988 testimony and subsequent JGR article forecasts of global warming? According to a laudatory article by AP’s Seth Borenstein, they “pretty much” came true, with other scientists claiming their accuracy was “astounding” and “incredible.”  Pat Michaels and Ryan Maue in the Wall Street Journal, and Calvin Beisner in the Daily Caller, disputed this.

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Wars of the Roses | 3 Minute History

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