Daily Archives: October 9, 2018

Stealth – How Does it Work? (Northrop B-2 Spirit)

Advertisements

Paul Romer: the view from Economic History

Economic Growth in History

In this post I write about the connections between Paul Romer’s work, which is essentially applied theory, and the empirical work on long-run economic growth done by economic historians. How was Romer influenced by the work of economic historians? has he influenced economic history? and have his theories been confirmed by the recent work of economic historians? (preview: I will argue that the answer is no).

Addendum shortly after publishing: my point above is not that Romer is wrong in general; in fact some of his ideas *about ideas* are fundamental for us to think about growth in the past. (Read on if this isn’t clear yet.)

Paul Romer’s was a well-deserved and long-anticipated prize. Many predicted he would eventually win, including myself in my very first academic article, written when I was a undergradute and published in 2008. (alternatively, click here for an ungated version). I now…

View original post 1,340 more words

What Does the New IPCC Report Say About Trends in Extreme Events?

The IPCC should be reporting a massive revision in the estimated cost of global warming as a percentage of GDP. It has not done that.

Roger Pielke Jr.

View original post

The Hypocrisy of the Left Over Equality

Green Jihad

Victor Davis Hanson is an American classicist, military historian, columnist, and farmer. He has been a commentator on modern and ancient warfare and contemporary politics for National Review, The Washington Times and other media outlets. He is a professor emeritus of classics at California State University, Fresno, and is currently the Martin and Illie Anderson Senior Fellow in classics and military history at Stanford University’s Hoover Institution.

In this segment of a lecture he gave last year, Dr. Hanson discusses the hypocrisy of the Left when it comes to equality. He especially gives interesting insights into intellectuals, like Al Gore, who seek fame and fortune while they study or advocate for Leftist causes.

View original post

Paul Romer: the view from Economic History

Economic Growth in History

In this post I write about the connections between Paul Romer’s work, which is essentially applied theory, and the empirical work on long-run economic growth done by economic historians. How was Romer influenced by the work of economic historians? has he influenced economic history? and have his theories been confirmed by the recent work of economic historians? (preview: I will argue that the answer is no).

Addendum shortly after publishing: my point above is not that Romer is wrong in general; in fact some of his ideas *about ideas* are fundamental for us to think about growth in the past. (Read on if this isn’t clear yet.)

Paul Romer’s was a well-deserved and long-anticipated prize. Many predicted he would eventually win, including myself in my very first academic article, written when I was a undergradute and published in 2008. (alternatively, click here for an ungated version). I now…

View original post 1,340 more words

Crony Capitalism with Chinese Characteristics: Chang-Tai Hsieh

Book Review: The Dictator’s Handbook

After reading this handbook, I concluded I had been far to generous about dictators and how horrible they were.

Scrub Physics

The Dictator’s Handbook: Why Bad Behavior is Almost Always Good Politics by Bruce Bueno de Mesquita and Alistair Smith

In a previous academic book, The Logic of Political Survival, the authors and others presented arguments in favor of a political model called selectorate theory. The Dictator’s Handbook is the popular (non-mathematical) version of that book. Oftentimes in political discourse we take disparate political systems and filter them into a one dimensional axis, with democracy on one end and autocracy on the other (a similar filtering happens when widely varying views on morality and policy are squeezed into the left-right axis). What selectorate theory instead argues for is a categorization of political systems into three nested groups:

  • The nominal selectorate, or interchangeables, includes those people who have at least some legal say in the selection of political leaders. In United States federal elections, this includes all adults over the age…

View original post 629 more words