Watching History of the Automobile: no cosy Detroit oligopoly – cutthroat competition over price, radically better new models; rollercoaster of massive profits then ruinous losses

Yale Brozen at http://www.independent.org/publications/article.asp?id=1159

Automakers and the Arsenal of Democracy

Is Public Wi-Fi Safe?

Animal Astronauts – The Space Race’s Unwitting Pioneers

Pyongyang calling: we spent a week in North Korea

Will the Kriegsmarine Rule the Waves? – WW2 – 013 24 November 1939

Adam Perry and Farrah Ahmed: Are Constitutional Statutes ‘Quasi-Entrenched’?

UK Constitutional Law Association

AdamFarrahThe Supreme Court issued its decision inH v Lord Advocate (pdf) in 2012. The decision has been virtually ignored by constitutional scholars, but we believe it may be of great constitutional significance. In this post we explain why, starting with some background about constitutional statutes.

Commentators have lately considered how constitutional statutes should be interpreted (for example Tarunabh Khaitanon this blog), and what exactly makes a statute ‘fundamental’ or ‘constitutional’ (for example David Feldman in the latest issue of LQR). A third issue, and our focus here, is how a constitutional statute can be repealed.

In the well-known 2002 case of Thoburn v Sutherland City Council, Laws LJ (with whom Crane J agreed) claimed that a constitutional statute is susceptible to implied repeal in a much narrower range of circumstances than an ordinary statute. At first Laws LJ put the point categorically: ‘Ordinary statutes may be impliedly…

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Alexander Horne: Evidence under oath, perjury and parliamentary privilege

For those interested in implied repeals of the bill of rights

UK Constitutional Law Association

Alexander HorneThe issue of select committee powers has received renewed interest during the 2010-15 Parliament, culminating in a report from Liaison Committee on Select committee effectiveness, resources and powers (in October 2012); and, subsequently, a report by the Joint Committee on Parliamentary Privilege in July 2013 (and a Government response later that year).

Although parliamentary select committees are frequently described as being powerful and influential, questions have arisen about their ability both to summon witnesses and punish those who are guilty of contempt or perjury.

In relation to the latter issue, the Government’s Green Paper on Parliamentary Privilege (Cm 8318, 2012), which preceded the Joint Committee’s report, had noted that:

The Houses’ power to punish non-members for contempt is untested in recent times. In theory, both Houses can summon a person to the bar of the House to reprimand them or order a person’s imprisonment. In addition, the House of Lords…

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Facts @jamespeshaw @mfe_news @Greenpeace @oxfamnz @GarethMP want down a @NZGreens memory hole

What do you gotta do to be fired at Corrections? An affair with an inmate? Smuggled contraband! @sst_nz

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