Daily Archives: January 27, 2019

Should we worry if MPs seize control of the parliamentary agenda?

The Constitution Unit Blog

download.001Ahead of Tuesday’s votes on Brexit, attention has focused on the rights and wrongs of the House of Commons seeking to ‘seize control’. Meg Russell argues that there’s nothing unusual about a democratic parliament controlling its own procedure and business. Indeed, the core principle of parliamentary sovereignty already gives the Commons control by default.

With stalemate over the Prime Minister’s Brexit deal, rejected dramatically by the House of Commons on 15 January by 432 votes to 202, there is increasing talk of parliament ‘seizing control’. On Tuesday, following the Speaker’s controversial decision to allow a vote on Conservative backbencher Dominic Grieve’s amendment speeding up the timetable, MPs will vote on a series of propositions about what should happen next. These include a further proposal by Grieve that the government’s usual control of the agenda should be set aside on specified days to allow MPs to make decisions on Brexit, and…

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School Security

Quiet Corner Tea Party

Consider, Limousine Liberals whose children attend private schools with an armed staff for protection lecture the rest of us that we cannot have armed staff in our schools protecting our children because it would be too dangerous.

You see, they have decided their children are more important than your children. They will protect your children with a sign, a law, and slogans. They do not live under the laws they create for you.

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Hayek’s Pretense of Knowledge

Quiet Corner Tea Party

Hayek’s advice on the limits of, and lack of knowledge to make accurate predictions and policy about complex phenomena does not just apply to economics. As I reread this article, it reminded me of the unscientific nature of the climate change alarmists, and their pretense of knowledge.   Some highlights from the article.

“It seems to me that this failure of the economists to guide policy more successfully is closely connected with their propensity to imitate as closely as possible the procedures of the brilliantly successful physical sciences – an attempt which in our field may lead to outright error.

This brings me to the crucial issue. Unlike the position that exists in the physical sciences, in economics and other disciplines that deal with essentially complex phenomena, the aspects of the events to be accounted for about which we can get quantitative data are necessarily limited and may not include the…

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Speaking of climate alarmism