EU destroys 700,000 hectares of rainforest for biofuels

Tallbloke's Talkshop


H/T The GWPF

All those trees would have absorbed large amounts of the carbon dioxide they claim to be so scared of. Somehow all this is deemed to be ‘sustainable’, using the climate excuse.

The EU wants to save our climate with supposedly green biofuels and has deemed palm oil “sustainable”. Yet on the other side of the globe, rainforests are being clear-cut to produce the 1.9 million tons of palm oil that end up in European fuel tanks every year, says Rainforest Rescue.

The European Union wants to protect the climate and reduce carbon emissions from motor vehicles by blending fuels with increasing shares of supposedly eco-friendly “biofuels”.

Last year, 1.9 million tons of palm oil were added to diesel fuel in the EU – in addition to millions of tons of equally harmful rapeseed and soybean oils.

The plantations needed to satisfy Europes’s demand for palm oil cover…

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Falling Behind and Catching up: India’s Transition from a Colonial Economy

The Long Run

by Bishnupriya Gupta (University of Warwick and CAGE)

The full paper of this blog post was published by The Economic History Review and it is available here 

152473-004-E0D19F36 Official of the East India Company riding in an Indian procession, watercolour on paper, c. 1825–30; in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Available at <https://www.britannica.com/topic/East-India-Company/media/1/176643/162308&gt;

There has been much discussion in recent years about India’s growth failure in the first 30 years after independence in 1947. India became a highly-regulated economy and withdrew from the global market. This led to inefficiency and low growth. The architect of Indian planning –Jawaharlal Nehru, the first prime minister, did not put India on an East Asian path. As a contrast, the last decade of the 20th century has seen a reintegration into the global economy and today India is one of the fastest growing economies.

Any analysis of Indian growth and development that…

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Collision Course: Offshore Wind Turbines Present New (Unnecessary) Mortal Danger for Trawlermen

STOP THESE THINGS

The fishermen who work off America’s Atlantic coast, are furious over plans to spear thousands of industrial wind turbines into their fishing grounds, destroying not only the seabed (the source of their income and prosperity), but wrecking their fishing grounds, forever.

Trawlermen off the New Jersey coast have already told developers what they can do with their projects: Deepwater in Deep Trouble: Fishermen Tell Off-Shore Wind Farm Developers to F@*#K Off

Trawlermen everywhere face plenty of mortal peril dished up by Poseidon and mother nature. However, for those fishermen braving the elements off the coast of Rhode Island and Massachusetts the prospect of hundreds of these things providing a deadly obstacle course is simply too much.

Fishing For A Living Is Dangerous. Will Offshore Wind Farms Make It Worse?
WSHU
Nadine Sebai
1 August 2019

New England commercial fishermen have one of the most dangerous jobs in the country. Now…

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#OTD Martin Luther King, Jr. I Have A Dream Speech

Black income mobility in an era of neoliberal ascendency @AOC @BernieSanders

A racial gap that dare not speak its name

Lessons from Lance

Knowledge Problem

Lynne Kiesling

So now we at least know something direct from the horse’s mouth about Lance Armstrong’s use of performance-enhancing drugs before and during his long run of commanding Tour de France performances. In addition to the interview with Oprah Winfrey, this CBS 60 Minutes segment and this Cycling News interview with Armstrong provide fuller details. If you do not follow cycling or have not been following these events, Juliet Macur’s New York Times story from January 6 provides a good summary. (By the way, Juliet Macur, ESPN’s Bonnie Ford, and WSJ’s Jason Gay (here and here recently) are outstanding journalists and writers whose insights and knowledge have been essential reading on cycling for years, not just in dissecting l’affaire Armstrong).

Having followed cycling since the mid-1980s, my sense is that Armstrong is right that PED use is endemic in quite a few sports, including cycling…

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Why do we ignore women’s sports?

Many more men than women watch sports. Women prefer to watch men’s sports. Oddly enough, the only sport that more women than men watch is boxing. Why would women want 2 athletic men in tight shorts beat themselves up?

Knowledge Problem

Lynne Kiesling

I’ve scheduled this to post while I’m out on one of my long rides … this interesting Outside magazine article explores why women’s sports attract so little attention. The article focuses on cycling:

The Giro d’Italia Femminile is the biggest race you’ve never heard of. Covering 961.4 kilometers of Italian countryside over nine days, 127 athletes compete for one of the sport’s biggest prizes—the pink jersey. And in 2010, an American won it all. But as is usual for women’s cycling, the coverage was muted.

Again in 2012, American cyclists should be in the news: Evelyn Stevens became only the second American—after Lance Armstrong—to win the spring classic Fleche Wallone. She also recently won a stage at the Giro d’Italia Femminile. And Kristin Armstrong is a favorite to defend her gold medal in the time trial at the London Olympics. There’s even a new race on the map:…

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Gordon Tullock on voting with your feet

Image

Adam Smith and the Digital Economy: Connectedness and Gains From Trade

Knowledge Problem

How can an 18th-century Scottish philosopher and economist help us understand the digital economy and our modern, hyper-connected world? That’s a question I’m tackling in a series of three essays at libertarianism.org.

Digital technologies have increased our connectedness in profound ways. In the first essay I examine how Smith’s ideas about specialization and exchange combine with Ronald Coase’s analyses of transaction costs to help us understand how much easier and more convenient commerce is today than it was in the pre-digital world.

Although humans may have inherent propensities to truck, barter, and exchange, engaging in transactions is costly—they take time, parties have to find each other and acquire information about the goods and services being offered and the terms of the offers, and trade among strangers can be stymied due to a lack of trust. Reducing those transaction costs leads to increased specialization and exchange, amplifying the market extension…

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