The Sting: How the Wind Industry Pulled Off the Greatest Con-Job in History

STOP THESE THINGS

OK, so we tell ’em it’s free and saves the planet, got it.

***

The 1973 Paul Newman (Henry “Shaw” Gondorff) and Robert Redford (Johnny “Kelly” Hooker) classic, The Sting – set in the heart of the 1930s Depression – pitted the bright and brazen young con-men against one of Chicago’s toughest mobsters in an effort to relieve him of his ill-gotten gains.

The film reveals the protagonists’ tactics, highlighting the importance of “the mark” and “the play” on the ‘mark’; “pigeons” (particularly easy ‘marks’) get taken like snacks at a Sunday barbecue and the big-con, which involved deploying a scam known as “the wire”.

Double-crossing, greed, avarice, hubris and arrogance provide a heady mix in a high-stakes gamble (It’s a great film, by the way).

But, at the heart of it all, was the ‘bare-faced lie’.

Much like those calamitous warnings about imminent global incineration, used by renewables…

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About Jim Rose

Utopia - you are standing in it promotes a classical liberal view of the world and champion the mass flourishing of humanity through capitalism and the rule of law. The origin of the blog is explained in the first blog post at https://utopiayouarestandinginit.wordpress.com/2014/03/12/why-call-my-blog-utopia-you-are-standing-in-it/

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