New Zealand sexes up the numbers on homelessness

Source: OECD Affordable Housing Database – http://oe.cd/ahd OECD – Social Policy Division – Directorate of Employment, Labour and Social Affairs Last updated on 24/07/2017 HC3.1 HOMELESS POPULATION

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Surprisingly little change in the percentage working from home since 2006 despite the emergence of smart phones and fast broadband

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, The Economics Daily, 24 percent of employed people did some or all of their work at home in 2015 on the Internet at https://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2016/24-percent-of-employed-people-did-some-or-all-of-their-work-at-home-in-2015.htm (visited December 09, 2017).

Many male-dominated occupations require little social contact @EricCrampton @worstall @SteveStuWill

Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, The Economics Daily, Working alone: jobs that required little personal interaction in 2017 on the Internet at https://www.bls.gov/opub/ted/2017/working-alone-jobs-that-required-little-personal-interaction-in-2017.htm (visited December 09, 2017).

On the economics of “Acting White”

There is much to be learned from the economics and sociology of oppositional identities.

As Roland Fryer pointed out, what is most important to the average 13-year-old is to be popular. Among some minorities, being popular and being smart are not compatible.

My analysis confirms that acting white is a vexing reality within a subset of American schools.

But Fryer also found that “In predominantly black schools, I find no evidence at all that getting good grades adversely affects students’ popularity”

Source: “Acting White” The social price paid by the best and brightest minority students by ROLAND G. FRYER, EducationNext 2006.