Was 75% of Piketty’s class war a measurement error?

Source: “Using Tax Data to Measure Long-Term Trends in U.S. Income Inequality.”
David Splinter and
Gerald Auten. Working paper for the 2017 Annual Meeting of the American Economics Association, 2016. 

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Why is the reduction in GDP levels so small? @GreenpeaceNZ @Oxfamnz

The global reduction in the level of GDP between now and 2060 is estimated to range between 0.6% and 4.4% is nothing is done. In the case of developing countries undergoing growth miracles, we are all talking about 6 months GDP growth! Russia and Canada will be overrun by tourists in the event of runaway climate change.

Source: The Economic Consequences of Climate Change The damages from selected climate change impacts to 2060 DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264235410-5-en

Unilateral carbon emissions as an international public good explained

Unilateral carbon emissions as an international public good explained

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NZ top 1% should be drummed out of the international ruling class? @EricCrampton

What a poor effort! The US top 1% is going from strength to strength by whatever explanation or conspiracy theory is your poison. The NZ top 1% is failing completely on its job as the ruling class extracting the labour surplus without mercy or pity to immiserise the proletariat just because it thinks that is a viable long-term strategy for its class.

Source: The material wellbeing of NZ households: Overview and Key Findings from the 2017 Household Incomes Report and the companion report using non-income measures (the 2017 NIMs Report) prepared by Bryan Perry, Ministry of Social Development, Wellington, July 2017.

The income share of the New Zealand top 1% has been falling and falling for a long time now. The class struggle has been cancelled in New Zealand. What is a point of the class war if the ruling classe is losing and the proletariat winning. Marxist would have nothing to whine about.

Back when I was to evict a drug addict from a rented house and throw him out on the street

While feuding with strangers on Facebook, I remembered I sat on the student housing committee as Treasurer of the Tasmanian University Union.

The committee worked very well because when students were defaulting on their rent or otherwise would be difficult, it was common for a member of the committee should know them. They could comment on whether the student was short of money or spending their money on alcohol or drugs often with them at the pub on Friday night. Several of us lived at university colleges so we knew lots of people. I told the committee to come down hard on one defaulting tenant because I knew he was wealthy and he just did not want to pay. He was just trying to on because he did not like to pay bills. We had the same problem with him paying the student club fees at my college.

I had a rather sleepless weekend because on Monday morning it was going to be the job of the committee to go around together and evict a student who refuse to pay his rent and refused to communicate with the housing officer, who was a professional housing officer. On Monday morning, I was greatly relieved to hear that he got in contact so he was not going to be evicted. I was one of several who knew of his drug habit.

My brother-in-law was a youth housing officer at the office of emergency housing in an Australian state. To do his job properly he had to face the world as it is. 

He said that the clients he dealt with, the teenagers and so forth, would never be taken in by a private landlord because they do not pay their rent, damage the place and invite all their mates over for parties. He believed everyone should have a house, but he did not pretend they are all model tenants.