Category Archives: economics of education

Yet another gender gap

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Fist fights broke out in the sociology department hosting this PhD over the ethics of the field research (wanted to avoid response bias)

From https://minerva.leeds.ac.uk/bbcswebdav/orgs/INTF00001/page%201_07.htm and

There were also social costs. The research occurred in the middle 1960s before institutional review boards were in existence. The dissertation proposal was reviewed only by Humphreys’ Ph.D. committee. Only after the research had been completed did the other members of the Sociology Department learn of it. A furor arose when some of those other members of the department objected that Humphreys’ research had unethically invaded the privacy and threatened the social standing of the subjects, and petitioned the president of Washington University to rescind Humphreys’ Ph.D. degree. The turmoil resulted in numerous other unfortunate events, including a fist fight among faculty members and the exodus of about half of the department members to positions at other universities.

There was considerable public outrage as well. Journalist Nicholas von Hoffman, who was given some details of the case by one of the angered members of the Sociology Department, wrote an article about Humphreys’ research and offered the following condemnation of social scientists: “We’re so preoccupied with defending our privacy against insurance investigators, dope sleuths, counterespionage men, divorce detectives and credit checkers, that we overlook the social scientists behind the hunting blinds who’re also peeping into what we thought were our most private and secret lives. But there they are, studying us, taking notes, getting to know us, as indifferent as everybody else to the feeling that to be a complete human involves having an aspect of ourselves that’s unknown.” (von Hoffman, 1970).

From http://www.drjkoch.org/Intro/Readings/Humphreys.htm

 

Robert Bork, Brown v. Board of Education (1954), and the radicalism of the original intent of equal protection before the law (via George Will)

The Gender Pay Gap

Stigler explains how intellectuals and consultants ply their policy trade honestly