Fifty Shades of Republic | Part 2: presidential (gubernatorial) veto powers

Fruits and Votes

This post is part of Fifty Shades of Republic, a series reviewing US political institutions at the state level

One of the most significant aspects of any presidential system is the extent of a president’s legislative power. Despite being known as the main example of a “separation of powers system”, few presidential systems really separate the classic “powers” (judicial, executive, and legislative) – instead, as Neustadt (1960) puts it in Presidential Power and the Modern Presidents, presidentialism typically creates a separation of offices which share powers.

The US constitution features a package veto subject to a two-thirds override. ‘Package’ means that when presented with a bill or resolution passed by Congress, the President can only agree to the proposal in full or veto it in full; by contrast, many presidents around the world, and governors of many US states, possess some version of an ‘amendatory’, ‘partial’, or ‘final…

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May 6, 1910: Death of King Edward VII of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

European Royal History

Edward VII (Albert Edward; November 9, 1841 – May 6, 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and the British Dominions, and Emperor of India from January 22, 1901 until his death in 1910.

The eldest son of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, and nicknamed “Bertie”, Edward was related to royalty throughout Europe. He was Prince of Wales and heir apparent to the British throne for almost 60 years.

During the long reign of his mother, he was largely excluded from political influence and came to personify the fashionable, leisured elite. He travelled throughout Britain performing ceremonial public duties, and represented Britain on visits abroad.

His tours of North America in 1860 and of the Indian subcontinent in 1875 proved popular successes, but despite public approval, his reputation as a playboy prince soured his relationship with his mother.

As king, Edward…

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The Stuarts: James II & The Glorious Revolution (1685-1689)

Great Books Guy

Whig historians would have us remember James II as a Catholic despot whose deposition was vital to the preservation of the British monarchy. His short but fractious reign was rife with tensions between Whig and Tory, Catholic and Protestant, and most importantly King and Parliament. The tumult only subsided when the Catholic king fled into exile, leaving his kingdom in the hands of a Protestant Dutchman, William of Orange.


As a young boy James was known to all as the Duke of York. He was concealed from the Parliamentarians during the Civil War while studying at Oxford, one of the last remaining Royalist strongholds. When the city of Oxford was under siege James fled, disguised as a woman, to the safer shores of the Hague and then to France to be with his mother. There he became an able soldier fighting alongside the French and the Spanish armies. He also…

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Bugger all union wage premium

David D Freidman 2013 – Global Warming and Other Good Things in Our Future

The First British Royal Consort: Prince George of Denmark, duke of Cumberland

The History of Parliament

In the latest post for the Georgian Lords, Dr Charles Littleton considers the career of Prince George of Denmark, consort of Queen Anne, who proved an important support for one of Britain’s unfairly underrated sovereigns.

The recent tributes to HRH Prince Philip, duke of Edinburgh, have emphasized that, at 69 years, he was the longest-serving royal consort in British history, with an active life of public service in support of his wife, HM the Queen. He has been frequently compared to Queen Victoria’s husband, Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg & Gotha. Far less well-known, however, is the first royal consort of a British queen – George, like the duke of Edinburgh a prince of the Danish royal line, who married Princess Anne, younger daughter of James, duke of York, in 1683.

Charles II provided the abiding impression of Prince George of Denmark with his observation, that ‘drunk or sober, there…

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Rocketing Power Prices & Grid Chaos: Germany’s Energy ‘Transition’ an Unmitigated Disaster

STOP THESE THINGS

If the object of its renewable energy ‘transition’ was World’s highest power prices, it’s mission accomplished for Germany’s ‘Energiewende’.

More than 30,000 wind turbines and millions of solar panels have made Germany the wind and solar cult’s favourite pinup girl. But there is not so much enthusiasm for Germany’s ‘green’ energy turn amongst businesses forced to power down when solar panels are blanketed in snow and ice, wind turbines are frozen solid and breathless, frigid weather means Germany’s fleet of whirling wonders are delivering absolutely nothing, at all.

Nor are there many fans amongst the millions of Germans who are struggling with power bills and the hundreds of thousands living without access to power because they can no longer afford it.

An audit report recently released in draft is telling German households and businesses what they already know: Germany’s renewable energy ‘transition’ is an unmitigated disaster.

Germany Energy Taxes to…

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The measure of monopsony – Alan Manning

State sector wage premium @TaxpayersUnion

Free speech in Parliament challenged: Maori Party MPs press the Speaker to bar questions they regard as “racist”

Point of Order

The Speaker was reprimanded by the PM yesterday, in the aftermath of the furore generated when he accused a former parliamentary staffer – to whom he had previously apologised for claiming he was a rapist – of sexual assault.

Then he was chided by Maori Party co-leader Debbie Ngarewa-Packer for failing to stop “racist” questions being asked in Parliament.

Other than Hansard, the only account of this attempt to curb MPs’ right to speak freely in Parliament was a Newshub report headed Rawiri Waititi lashes out at ‘Māori bashing’ in Parliament as Jacinda Ardern challenges Judith Collins to say ‘partnership’

But to whom – we wonder – is the Speaker accountable?

To Members of Parliament, we would have thought, because they vote to elect the Speaker at the start of each new Parliament (after every general election).

 This is the first task of every new Parliament once members have been…

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