Kinnock, Militant and ‘The Speech of his Life’

It was the speech that put Labour back on the long and often rocky road to government, but why did Neil Kinnock feel the need to take on the Militant Tendency back in 1985?

The Road to Bournemouth

img_0881-5

The development of Militant as a political force is traced back to 1964, with the founding of the newspaper – The Militant. The ‘entryist’ group emerged from the Revolutionary Socialist League and its goal was to infiltrate the Labour party in order to bring about their radical political agenda. By 1975 Labour looked to deal with the issue of ‘entryism’ into the party in the Underhill Report – but the NEC voted against publishing the report and decided to take no further action.

After Labour’s defeat in 1979, Militant felt emboldened by the new changes in the party structure that had given greater power to the activist base. Early on in his premiership…

View original post 1,372 more words

Image

Labour and the Left in the 1980s: Every Dog has its Day

It was Tony Benn who said that there is no final victory or final defeat. But for the Labour left, the 1980s represented a definitive moment. What followed was a New Labour leader who argued Thatcherism was both right and inevitable. The left never subscribed to that view and, should they end up in government, will do everything within their power to reverse it. 

Book Review: Labour and the Left in the 1980s, Manchester University Press, Dec 2017

‘Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past.’ George Orwell. 1984

The success and discipline of the Conservative Party throughout history has been a source of begrudging admiration for many on the left. The Tories ability to control the historical narrative of the nation’s collective memory has led to the belief that their economic decisions were both inevitable and irreversible. From the General Strike to the Winter of Discontent through the Miners Strike and right up…

View original post 3,064 more words

Gallery

IEA: Petrochemicals set to be the largest driver of world oil demand

Tallbloke's Talkshop

Oil extraction [image credit: ewg.org]
A recent energy conference was told: “The world will attain the 100 million barrels a day mark of [oil] consumption later this year, much sooner than we all earlier projected.” This report notes that petrochemicals ‘are required to manufacture many parts of the modern energy system, including solar panels, wind turbines, batteries, thermal insulation and electric vehicles’.

Petrochemicals are set to account for more than a third of the growth in world oil demand to 2030, and nearly half the growth to 2050, adding nearly 7 million barrels of oil a day by then, reports Green Car Congress.

They are also poised to consume an additional 56 billion cubic meters (bcm) of natural gas by 2030, and 83 bcm by 2050.

View original post 250 more words

Would we be better off stepping into a time machine and going back to 1979

.@NZGreens are for net neutrality so it must be a bad idea. Easy policy shortcut?

How the US failed to rebuild Afghanistan

If @ProfSteveKeen’s Minsky model was good enough to predict the GFC, why was @NZTreasury asked to pay for 3 years more coding?

“A Watershed Conference”: Why the Left still Revere the 1980 Labour Conference

10 Ridiculous Things Found in Osama Bin Laden’s Compound

AJP Taylor railway timetables and mobilisation plans

Previous Older Entries

Bruner the Anarchist

The State is merely a legalized mafia claiming a monopoly on violence

Helen Joyce

Celebrating humanity's flourishing through the spread of capitalism and the rule of law

Inequalities

Research and reflection from both sides of the Atlantic

freer lives

A socialist critique of gender ideology

200-Proof Liberals

Celebrating humanity's flourishing through the spread of capitalism and the rule of law

Darwinian Business

A blog exploring business from an evolutionary perspective, by Max Beilby

Spin, strangeness, and charm

Politics, media bias, science, and psychology

Family Inequality

by Philip N. Cohen

What Paul Gregory is Writing About

Celebrating humanity's flourishing through the spread of capitalism and the rule of law

Woman's Place UK

Violence against women and sex discrimination still exist. Women need reserved places, separate spaces and distinct services.

TVHE

The Visible Hand in Economics

Kids Prefer Cheese

Celebrating humanity's flourishing through the spread of capitalism and the rule of law

George Mason Economics Society

Provoking discussion by publishing economic writing

Offsetting Behaviour

Celebrating humanity's flourishing through the spread of capitalism and the rule of law

JONATHAN TURLEY

Res ipsa loquitur - The thing itself speaks

single sex spaces

Single sex spaces are a question of consent

Adventures of a Tudor Nerd

Tudor History from the Wars of the Roses to the Death of Elizabeth I

Weapons and Warfare

History and Hardware of Warfare

No Punches Pulled

Laughter – the best medicine

TannerOnPolicy

Politics and Policy with a Libertarian Twist

Notes On Liberty

Spontaneous thoughts on a humble creed

Map Dragons

Written by map lovers for map lovers

New Historical Express

(Formerly Hatful of History)

CONVERSABLE ECONOMIST

Celebrating humanity's flourishing through the spread of capitalism and the rule of law

Barrie Saunders

Thoughts on public policy and the media

The Victorian Commons

Researching the House of Commons, 1832-1868

Coyote Blog

Celebrating humanity's flourishing through the spread of capitalism and the rule of law

American Enterprise Institute – AEI

Celebrating humanity's flourishing through the spread of capitalism and the rule of law

The History of Parliament

Blogging on parliament, politics and people, from the History of Parliament

Catallaxy Files

Australia's leading libertarian and centre-right blog

Books & Boots

reflections on books and art

Legal History Miscellany

Posts on the History of Law, Crime, and Justice

Sex, Drugs and Economics

Celebrating humanity's flourishing through the spread of capitalism and the rule of law

The Long Run

the EHS blog

Vincent Geloso

Economics, History, Lots of Data and French Stuff

Climatism

Tracking Anthropogenic Climate Alarmism

%d bloggers like this: